Abstract

Photon Probability Control with Experiments

Author(s): Solomon BT and Beckwith AW

Quantum theory does not have a mechanism that explains how Nature implements probabilities. Thus, the main objective of this paper is to present new directions for the photonics research for the control of photon localization from probabilistic properties, and another step towards a probability field theory. The expectation is to improve photon collection and loss mitigation. The paper delves into the physics of photon probability control to explain the basis for the 4 new proposed experiments. It is known that photons are not affected by the presence of electric or magnetic fields. Therefore, an alternative question is, can photon probabilities be controlled? Probability control means vectoring and modulation. Vectoring is the control of the direction of localization, and modulation is the control of the distance to localization. This paper proposes a control mechanism by rethinking the foundations of quantum theory, using (i) a modified Schrödinger wave function, (ii) a new structure for particle design, (iii) the existence of subspace (x, y, zand no t), (iv) that all particles consists of a disc of the modified Schrödinger or the probabilistic wave function, orthogonal to the particle’s motion vector and (v) all other particle properties (e.g. electromagnetic wave, charge, mass, etc.) are added to this structure. The shape of the new probabilistic wave function is very close to that of the Schrödinger wave function. It is proposed that probabilities can be controlled by altering the electric and magnetic field densities, as probabilities are function the electric and magnetic fields. Thus, a new formula for the Airy Pattern. Modified Airy Pattern experiments are proposed to confirm these findings. These include measuring the photon’s electric field amplitude, the electric fields in materials, using the Airy Pattern to filter photons by their phase. The new theoretical results confirm that probability is a function of the wavelength. Finally, more than 4 experiments are proposed.


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