Effect of cadmium on body weight and liver histopathological changes of Rana ridibunda ridibunda

Author(s): Semaa Ahmed Baker

Cadmium is ubiquitous metals in the environment that induces a broad range of physiological dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chronic effect of Cadmium (Cd) on body weight, size and histopathology of the liver of Rana ridibunda ridibunda. Animals were divided at randomgroups into a control and 3 experimental groups exposed to different concentration of Cadmiumchloride (CdCl2) (2.5, 5.0 and 10µg / L) for (28 days). The animal body weight, total body length and width weremeasured before and at the end of experiments,then animals sacrificed. Liver was dissected out for histological examination. Cd -exposure had an obvious negative effect on the rate of overall growth of the test animals.A number of morphological change were observed in the liver, including the disturbed arrangement of the hepatic cords, dilatation of sinusoids, the presence of binucleated hepatocytes, dissociation of the hepatic cord and the presence of pigment aggregations as well swelling of hepatocytes, crowding of hepatocytes plus the presence of area of necrosis of hepatocytes at the three cadmium treatments, the more severe was at 10 µg /L cadmium. It can be concluded that the Cd exposure increase tissue damage in liver. In summary, this study provides data on toxic effect in amphibian exposed to different concentration sub lethal of heavy metals in particular cadmium. Rana ridibunda ridibunda Develops regressive alterations in the liver when exposed to Cd which may partially be a result of the oxidative stress induced by metal toxicant. The frog liver has a strong regenerative capability but severe liver injury do not develop even after 28 days of exposure to relatively high doses of Cadmium.

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