Abstract

To Study the Effect of Water Extract of Plant Cassia Fistula as a Antiinflammatory Agent on Channa Punctatus Fish

Author(s): V. D. Mane, P. R. Rajput, M. O. Malpani and M. V. Shirbhate

The present work deals with evaluation of anti-inflammatory response of water extract of cassia fistula leaves on channa punctatus fishes. For that, fishes were exposed to 0.15 gm/L-1 (96 hr) sub-lethal concentration of a dride Parthenium flower extract in aquatic medium of aged tap water for 30 days with a regular interval of 7 days. In gonads, exposure dependent histological damage has been observed in terms of vacuolization, condensation of spermatogonic cells, distortion of tubular epithelium and shrinkage of interstitial cells. Gross histoanatomy of ovarian tissue reveals epithelial lesions, stormal haemorrhage, increased interstitium and shrinkage of yolk vesicles towards periphery. These findings are quite suggestive of reproductive impairments leading to delayed gonadial maturity and adversely affecting processes of sperm production and ovulation and thus, the fish production. In the next set of experiment, (0.15 gm/L-1) concentrations of water extract of cassia fistula leaves were run simultaneously with the same concentration of a Parthenium flower extract (0.15 gm/L-1) in aquatic medium of aged tap water for 30 days with a regular interval of 7 days. In mixed treatment, cassia fistula leaves extract significantly reduce the histological damage observed due to sub-lethal concentration of a Parthenium flower extract and help for healthy reproduction. In the next set of experiment, fishes were exposed to 0.15 gm/L-1 concentrations of water extract of cassia fistula leaves and that better histological changes were observed as compared to previous set of experiment i.e. control. Results suggested that under present experimental conditions; water extract of cassia fistula leaves exhibit reproductive activity and it may show antiinflammatory activity in this fish model, which could further contribute to study its benefit in humans.


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